IAPPart one – Assignment Context & Critical Analysis

A1 Context & Critical Analysis

The Non Familiar

Back Course Work

Research Context and Critical Analysis Development Initial Submission

Tutor Feedback Reflection Rework Final Submission

 

Context

From the exercises and the research during the exercises the following points have been demonstrated and references given:

  • Historic portrait artists such as Sander used background Pose and Props to convey information about the subjects:
  • Typology is a science that has been adopted by portrait artists to categories a collect images together in a series
  • Identity is key to portraying the individual place helps to convey who someone is
  • Portraits tell us who the photographer wants the subject to be not necessarily who they are
  • Displaying a series of portraits together sometimes tells a different story to the individual images

 

From Research into the Assignment the following seems relevant:

Taking portraits of people you do not know is difficult:

Westergren, D. (2013) How to photograph strangers. Available at: http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/15/how-to-photograph-strangers/ (Accessed: 29 March 2016).
(Westergren, 2013)
“Taking a photograph of someone you don’t know is one of the most difficult things to do for many beginning photographers.” (Westergren, 2013)
ebook (2015) How to photography people you don’t know by David Smith | world travel photography tips & adventures. Available at: http://www.interfaceimages.com/blog/2011/08/travel-photography-tip-taking-photos-of-people-you-dont-know/ (Accessed: 29 March 2016).
(ebook, 2015)
“Local people add color and excitement to travel pictures so photograph them…an intimidating idea to many of us. Flowers, animals and mountain lakes don’t talk back to you but it is people who make the world colorful, friendly and more interesting (IMHO). Be aware that different cultures react differently to foreigners and photographers.” (ebook, 2015)

How do we overcome this Dan Westergren says:

Westergren, D. (2013) How to photograph strangers. Available at: http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/15/how-to-photograph-strangers/ (Accessed: 29 March 2016).
(Westergren, 2013)
So, how do you get comfortable taking pictures of people? The first step is to realize that most people don’t mind being photographed. The simplest thing to do is make up your mind that you are interested in showing people in your photographs and force yourself to go out and meet people with your camera.

 

Dan also says that a project or assignment is critical:

Westergren, D. (2013) How to photograph strangers. Available at: http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/15/how-to-photograph-strangers/ (Accessed: 29 March 2016).
(Westergren, 2013)
“Give yourself an assignment — a story that you would like to cover. This story idea will go a long way toward making people feel comfortable with you photographing them, providing an answer to the inevitable question they will ask when you make the request: why?” (Westergren, 2013)

 

“It’s very important to force yourself to interact with people when you want to take their picture. Some people are naturally friendly and enjoy walking up to strangers and introducing themselves. The camera gives you an excuse to become one of those people.” (Westergren, 2013)
 

Critical Analysis

From the research done it would seem that it is important to have a topic, this assignment could be accomplished by just walking outside my house and asking the first five people I meet to let me take their photo.

Clearly that would not acheive very much and would not tie into the work that has been accomplished so far in the exercises, as I want to make my work more heavily based on my research in this module I would therefore follow that the elements described above are the key learning points of the module so far.

This leaves me needing to create an assignment that is:

  1. 5 Portraits of people I do not know (Key request from the assignment brief)
  2. Relates in some way to historic portraiture as studied:
    1. Probably a typology to give the project a theme
    2. Using background props and pose to convey the identity of the subjects
  3. Has a theme or subject see typology in point 2